Cool Cities

Environmentally Friendly Cities in America


What's This?

What's This?


Hello – you’re in the right place, but the Cool Cities program and its website is no longer available as it was. So what's next? You can check out the alternative websites on this page before you go to find resources on green tech and the environment.


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Alternative Websites


Sierra Club

Founded by conservationist John Muir in 1892 and now boasting over two million members, the Sierra Club is the nation’s largest environmental organization. Get the latest environmental news, updates, programs, and initiatives by visiting the official website, and connect with the Sierra Club on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, Linkedin, and YouTube.

SCGH – Green Home – It Begins Where You Live

Established in 2008 and formerly known as the Sierra Club Green Home, the SCGH is a blog focused on social responsibility, environmental, and green issues. Read featured stories, get insight on relevant global business trends, and get ideas and inspiration for building a stylish, green, and environment-friendly home. You can also find the SCGH on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

The Sierra Club Foundation

Founded in 1960, the Sierra Club Foundation is an environmental non-profit and charity organization. They focus on educating people on environmental preservation and on supporting the Sierra Club and other non-profits with similar goals.

The Nature Conservancy

Established in 1951, Virginia-based The Nature Conservancy is one of the most efficient and trusted charitable environmental organizations in America. They effect change and support programs nationwide and in over 60 countries worldwide, including 100 marine conservation projects globally. You can connect to The Nature Conservancy on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, Linkedin, Flipboard, and Flickr.

The Wilderness Society

The Wilderness Society was founded in 1935 and advocates for the protection and preservation of America’s shared natural areas and wildlands. They lobby for environmental causes at the local, state, and federal level, provide educational and outreach efforts, and they also host one of the most valuable collection of Ansel Adams photographs. You can also find The Wilderness Society on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Linkedin, and YouTube.

News


Protecting the wild places

The Register-Guard comments on a proposed legislative measure that may potentially undo previous efforts to preserve wilderness areas and scenic trails across the nation.

Coal Companies’ Secret Funding of Climate Science Denial Exposed

Writing for the Huffington Post, Elliot Negin of the Union of Concerned Scientists talks about how dirty energy’s links to climate science denial is increasingly becoming apparent.

Environmental groups slam UN’s biofuels report

Read about why environmental groups are disturbed about a UN report on second-generation biofuels and its recommendations for developing nations.

Going Green: Eight Celebrities Who Are Environmental Advocates

How much does Hollywood care about the planet? Nature World News’ Jhay Are See writes about eight celebrities who advocate for the environment.

Alliance for Food and Farming: EWG Attempts to Re-Spark Interest in Decades-Old “Dirty Dozen” List

Read about why the AFF is questioning the Environmental Working Group’s “Dirty Dozen” List’s accuracy and relevance.

3 Great Things About Living in Green Cities and Being Around Green Spaces


Cities are the social and economic nerve centers of any country. A well-designed and properly governed city can support large and growing populations and enable continuous growth and adapt to the needs of its citizens and economy; a haphazardly designed and run city can have the opposite effect. Today, one of the ways that modern cities are increasingly looking into is sustainable architecture and urban planning – applying environmentally friendly methods and technologies to reap the benefits of what science has shown to be effective and beneficial ways of living and operating both public and private institutions.

Just what are the advantages of living in a green city? Well, let’s look at three of 'em:

Businesses Save (and Earn) More Money

Thoughtful, appropriately planned and planted green spaces have many economic benefits: they increase the property value of homes, and commercial areas attract more potential patrons from further away who stay longer and spend more than they otherwise would had there been less trees and green spaces, in addition to reducing waste and promoting efficient use of the resources and materials at hand through sustainable resource technologies and practices.[1]

Green Cities Are Safer and Experience Lower Criminal Activity

Studies have shown that cities and neighborhoods with green spaces can experience anywhere from 25%-50% reduction in property-related or violent crimes, and there are less instances of graffiti, vandalism, and littering in outdoor spaces with natural landscapes.[2]

People Live Longer, Happier Lives

Parks, natural landscapes, and green spaces do more than just liven up a place – these play significant roles in the health of nearby populations. People who live near and spend time in green spaces such as parks or neighborhood gardens experience lower instances of depression, anxiety, and better physical health overall.[3][4]


There we go – more and more cities are starting to turn green, and that can only mean good things for the people living in them.



About the Author: Andre Salvatierra is a freelance writer who loves culture, technology, well-designed things, and great experiences. You can find him on Medium and Twitter.